Guidelines

From Geo Hashing
Jump to: navigation, search
  • Always research a geohash location and its surrounding areas thoroughly before attempting to access it.
  • Do not attempt to reach coordinates which fall within a dangerous area, are inaccessible, or would require illegal trespass.
Caution: Big Game hunting occurs during Fall and Early Winter in the US and extra precaution should be taken when hashing in Public Forested areas. Check out your State's website for dates of your local seasons. If you do come across a hunter, wave, whistle or say something to insure that you know they see you and move out of that area. Click for more notes.
  • Please respect the area you are visiting. Absolutely do not litter or otherwise disturb the natural integrity of the area.
  • Make goodwill gestures and be public-spirited.
    • Bring a bag and pick up garbage whilst at the location. If Geohashing is combined with a goodwill gesture such as litter-picking, landowners may be more willing to permit access. You can also earn the Geotrash Achievement while doing so.
    • Check out OpenStreetMap and add or correct map features from your expedition.
  • Please be reasonable when meetup locations fall on public property. Be considerate of non-geohashers who may want to enjoy/use the area as much as you and try not to be in anyone's way. If someone has to ask you to move, then you need to move.
  • If someone approaches you and asks you to leave a geohash location on private property, do not force the issue and comply forthwith.
    • If this occurs during a Saturday meetup, all attendees should immediately move to the nearest non-disputed area, then agree on an alternative location at which to continue the event.
    • Come prepared: Have alternative locations in mind before leaving!
    • It may be helpful to have some written materials with you to show suspicious property owners. For example, you could print out a page with information about geohashing, as well as a map showing the location, and write down a TinyURL linking to that day's coordinates. They may not actually mind your presence and — who knows? — they might even join you.
    • Be aware of your country's freedom to roam laws. Some countries do not have them at all, while others allow certain types of uninvited use of private land.